10 Mile Training Plan


This 10 mile training plan was designed for the beginner to intermediate runner that has conquered the 5k and is looking for a bigger challenge.  Growing in popularity, the 10 mile race is a great endurance event.  And just any other distance race, the 10 mile training plan will focus on gradually building up your endurance and stamina through weekly long runs.Your training and race-day preparations will be very similar to that of a marathon.  For example, you’ll need to focus on safe mileage build-up, hydration, avoiding chaffing, shoe replacement, etc…  All of these factors may sound simple or minor, but they do take some planning and consideration in your training plan.  Something as simple as running with a water-bottle for a 1-hour training run or putting some Vaseline in strategic locations could save you hours, or even days, of discomfort.  Check out the long run page for some good distance running training tips. There are 3 primary building blocks of this 10 mile training plan that you’ll want to focus on and modify as necessary to meet your individual needs.  They are:

  1. The long run
    This is the primary building block of any long distance training plan.  Run once a week, it should be no more than 15% longer (or 1-mile) than last week’s long run.  It’s the most important workout of your week.  Plan your schedule around it – even if the weather is less than optimal.  Try not to miss your weekly long run…you really can’t cram the gradual physiological benefits that comes from this week-to-week increase.

  2. The daily run
    These runs will make up more than 50% of your entire training volume and are a significant part of your training.  Run at a comfortable pace and concentrate on your form.  For the intermediate to advanced runners, try a mid-week speed workout, like a tempo run on 1-2 of these weekday runs.

  3. Rest / Cross Training
    This may be listed as the last “building block”, but it is nearly as important as the first.  Without rest, our bodies will not have the chance to heal, rebuild and get stronger.  You need these days in order to get stronger for your next workout.  Don’t skip them.  Even advanced runners would be foolish to run more often than 6 days per week for any extended period of time.  If you must exercise on “rest” days, try exercising your non-running muscles by swimming, biking, or using an elliptical machine (i.e. Cross-Train or XT).

Sound good?  Ready to get the training plan?  The schedule below was designed for someone that has a base of running 10+ miles per week with a long run of 3 miles.  If this is above your current training level, don’t worry, just check out this 10-week training plan to start running to see where you are in terms of weekly miles & long run capability.  You might just need to add a few weeks on the front-end of this schedule to get you ready.  And while ambitiousness is good in almost every aspect of today’s world, please don’t be afraid to take more time than this 10 mile training plan (below) if you need it!.  So many runners burnout or get an overuse injury, because they tried to do too much too quickly.  It’s far better to take a gradual approach to this and any training plan.



10 Mile Training Plan

Week MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN
1 3 0 3 0 3 0 4
2 3 0 3 0 3 0 5
3 3 0 3 0 3 0 6
4 4 0 3 0 3 0 7
5 4 0 3 0 3 0 8
6 4 0 3 0 3 0 9
7 4 0 4 0 3 0 10
8 4 3 4 0 3 0 11
9 4 3 4 0 3 0 5
10 4 0 4 4 0 0 10
Long Slow Distance:  1-2 minutes slower than 10-mile goal pace (GP)
Brisk pace:  Try running these workouts slightly faster than your normal pace.
Rest - let your muscles heal
Comfortable pace (45-75 seconds slower than GP)

If you’re looking for a popular 10-mile road race, here are a few of the more popular ones in the U.S.:

From nutrition to strength training, there are numerous tools, tips, calculators and motivational articles located on this website to help runners of all abilities attain their running & fitness goals. Please check out the Site Map and scroll through the sections that best fit your 10 mile training plan needs. Happy Running!

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